How To Be A Camp Host: Super Helpful Advice

How To Be A Camp Host: Super Helpful Advice


If you’ve ever wondered how to be a camp host, you’ve come to the right place. We’re going to tell you how to find camp host jobs, how and when to apply, and what makes the job so rewarding.

In Episode 426 of the RV Podcast, we talk to Erik and Jeanne Anderson, full-time RVers who are about to spend six months as camp hosts on the east coast. Erik and Jeanne – and Hershey pup, their charming little Cavalier King Charles spaniel – have visited all 48 states in their RV and share with us the research that has led them to their new jobs as camp hosts.

But there’s so much more in this episode, including RV News, your Questions and Answers about the RV Lifestyle, and lots of links and resources about valuable camping and RV travel information.

To see the video version of the Podcast on our YouTube RV Lifestyle Channel, click the video player below.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=34L3J9kT5JQ[/embed]

For an audio-only version of the RV Podcast, you can listen on your favorite podcast app or click the player below.

Welcome to this episode of the RV Podcast

Christmas is almost here. Can you believe it? Where has 2022 gone?

December is the slowest month of the year for RV travel. Jen and I usually spend the month at our sticks and bricks home in Michigan and use this month for our annual medical and dental checkups. But with our new 10 acres in Southwestern Michigan, we’ve found ourselves camping several nights so far this month on the property.

There’s been cold and snow, but we’ve managed to be snug and warm in the RVs. We expect to camp there at least one night this week, too.

We also have one more trip to Elkhart, IN, that we plan on making this coming week to get a sneak peek and video of some new RV models that will be introduced next month at the big Tampa, FL RV show. But after that, we plan to slow down and enjoy the Holiday season for a couple of weeks with family and friends.

Before we get to the Interview of the week on How to Be a Camp Host, we want to pass along this very powerful comment from one of our followers, a retired police officer named Ed.

Ed talks about a serious issue – excessive highway speed by RVers:

Hi Mike and Jennifer…

I am a recently retired highway patrolman and as a law enforcement officer, I saw more than my share of accidents and many involving RVs.

Now as an RVer myself, I see so many other RVers driving way too fast. Never should you drive over 70. In fact, my advice is between 60 and 65.

Yes, you will be passed.

And you may feel you want to go faster. But don’t. Especially if you are towing. We tow a 35-foot fifth wheel and I never drove more than 62. I put the speed control on at that and leave it at that.

I do that because of my experience as a cop and how I personally saw more times than I care to remember how excessive speed in RVs can result in catastrophic accidents.

Consider this a public service announcement from someone who knows. 

How to Be a Campground Host – Erik and Jeanne Anderson interview

Erik and Jeanne Anderson - and Hershey the Pup - tell us How to Be a Camp Host
Erik and Jeanne Anderson – and Hershey the Pup – tell us How to Be a Camp Host

Erik and Jeanne Anderson, along with their dog, Hersey Pup, have spent the past two and a half years RVing throughout all of the lower 48 states and six Canadian provinces. They’ve driven more than 27,000 miles, and shared much of their adventure in photos on our RV Lifestyle Facebook group.

We caught up recently with Erik and Jeanne, because during this next year they have decided to become volunteer campground hosts at Killens Pond State Park in Felton, Delaware. A perk of the job? It is just 30 minutes from two of their granddaughters.

Plus free campground rent and full hookups!

We get many questions from people wondering just what are campground hosts, wondering if the jobs could be used to stretch their travel dollar. So we thought it would be fun to talk to Erik and Jeanne about what led them to try this out, specifically how they found the job they will take next year.

And be sure to read through the end of the interview for some very helpful bonus resources on how to be a campground host and finding work camping jobs.

Here’s an edited transcript of the interview:

About the Andersons: Fulltime RVers

Mike Wendland:

Joining us right now is Erik Anderson and his wife Jeanne. You guys have been on before talking about full-time RV Life, but it’s always good to see you. And look at all the festive holiday lights behind you. Merry Christmas!

Erik Anderson:

Yeah. Merry Christmas. Good to see you, Mike.

Jeanne Anderson:

Yeah.

Mike Wendland:

You guys are in Miramar Beach, Florida, if I’m not mistaken. Right?

Erik Anderson:

Right.

Jeanne Anderson:

Yep, that’s where we are.

Mike Wendland:

That’s great. Well, this is a particularly great time of year to be down there. Today, we want to talk about the expertise that you have acquired on how to be a camp host. And I know you start doing that later this year, but one of the things you both are known for is the meticulous planning and research you have done on your travels. I know it’s Erik in particular.

Jeanne Anderson:

Yeah, I’m just along for the ride.

Mike Wendland:

But you guys have been everywhere. How many states now?

Erik Anderson:

We’ve covered the lower 48 states as of October, and six Canadian provinces too. Yep.

Mike Wendland:

Something like 27,000 miles you have driven in your RV. And I know you’re getting 2023 all planned out, but I bet you’re even onto ’24.

Erik Anderson:

We have some ideas going out there. Yeah.

How they decided to be a camp host: What campground hosts do

how to be a camp host and responsibilities
Cleaning is a big part of the camp host job

Mike Wendland:

Well, so when it came to this idea of how to be a camp host, this is the time of year that we get a lot of requests from people for information about it. And you are the perfect guest to have. So let’s talk about that. One, for those who are unfamiliar, what exactly is a camp host? What does that involve?

Erik Anderson:

Okay, sure. Well, camp hosts or campground hosts, will typically be in a national state park or other municipal public type of park setting. And the camp hosts are just that, hosts. They’re there to greet campers, to do check-in and checkout type processes, be an ambassador for the park and the agency. And typically, it’s a volunteer position, but with a number of perks and benefits, which is part of the reason why we want to do it.

Jeanne Anderson:

Free camping.

Erik Anderson:

A free site with free hookups and different perks and benefits that come along with that. And really an opportunity to interact with the campground visitors and give them the best camping experience at the park that they can have.

Jeanne Anderson:

Camp hosts also keep the area clean and just make sure that the rules are in place. But we were told to just not get too involved in enforcement.

If something goes wrong and you don’t feel comfortable, just call the rangers. They’ll take care of the hard stuff.

Mike Wendland:

Well, first question after all this is, besides those perks which you mentioned, but after all your years of exploring and adventuring and traveling, this is going to have you static for a while, a little longer than you normally are?

Jeanne Anderson:

Six months. Yeah.

How to Be a Camp Host: Super Helpful Advice 1
View of the Delaware River

Why be a camp host?

Mike Wendland:

That’s a big switch from being truly nomads and traveling all 48 lower states to now become camp host in one spot. Jeanne, start off. What were the reasons why?

Jeanne Anderson:

We knew that we were coming close to an end of traveling constantly. And we were looking for places where we could stop for a while. We went to Utah and we were like, “Oh, this would be a beautiful place to camp host.” But the reason we picked Delaware was, I have to say, my son is there, my beautiful daughter-in-law and our two grandchildren.

And so we just decided … We picked a couple of places and the first one was of course Delaware because of family was there.

So there were three parks that we looked at. And we were lucky enough to actually be able to look around. And not too many people can do this. So we had gone to three of the parks. One was right on the beach, no shade whatsoever.

And so we were thinking, “Oh, this will be cool, this will be great.” And then we realized, not maybe, it would just be complete sun, sand, all. But we were told that park wasn’t available. And then we went to Killens Pond State Park.

How to Be a Camp Host: Super Helpful Advice 2

And we went there and it really was beautiful. It had shade. So we got to check out all the different parks. And at first, we thought the beach would be fun, but then for six months with constant sun, constant sand, we thought, “Oh, maybe that wouldn’t be so great.”

It turned out it wasn’t available anyway. And when we went to Killens Pond, it seemed a lot more inviting for us. And there was camp host job availability there. So luckily, we got to pick and see what was available. And it’s only half an hour away from my son and my grandchildren. And we just applied for it.

Being a camp host will save them money

Erik Anderson:

But to your point, Mike, we were traveling at quite a pace over the past two years, which we really wanted to slow things down a little bit and an opportunity to save some money as well.

Mike Wendland:

Have you done any calculations about how much you’ll really save this year? Do you have any figures on that?

Erik Anderson:

Absolutely. Matter of fact, that’s one of our motivations for slowing down a bit for next year is to save some money, keep some more in our bank account. And it was an expensive year to travel, especially with fuel costs, as everybody’s been talking about, when we were paying $7 a gallon in California.

So I figured for all of our travels from April to October this year, we spent about $7,400 just in gas.

Mike Wendland:

Just in fuel?

Erik Anderson:

Just in fuel. So that was pretty significant. And so I figure that with us sitting still doing the camp hosting, we’re going to save probably a good $5,000 in fuel for that period of time.

And then when we figure our nightly camping fee average, because we do a lot of state parks, COEs, boondocking, dry camping, our average is around $32 a night for our camping fees.

So when I factored that in, I figured we’re going to save at least $5,000 in terms of fees.

So if we stick it out through this whole six-month period next summer and we could save a good … I think at least $10,000. And that’s substantial.

Jeanne Anderson:

Yeah, absolutely.

Mike Wendland:

And you’re still doing the RV lifestyle, you’re in a great spot and you’re near the grandkids.

Jeanne Anderson:

Yeah.

They researched how to be a camp host

How to Be a Camp Host: Super Helpful Advice 3

Mike Wendland:

When did your research, did you talk to other camp hosts? And if so, did they tell you what to look for and what to avoid besides things like too much sun and no shade, stuff like that?

Jeanne Anderson:

I know that sounds crazy, but yeah.

Erik Anderson:

Yeah, absolutely. Because I think state parks, county parks, COE parks, those are kind of our favorites.

So we’ve stayed in a lot of state parks and kind of made a habit of seeking out the camp hosts and chatting them up a bit and seeing how they liked their assignments, how long they’ve been doing it, what they enjoyed, what they didn’t enjoy, and trying to get advice as well from all the camp hosts that we met around the country. So that was very helpful.

Mike Wendland:

You picked Delaware because it was close to family and you’ve actually visited the sites. What’s the application process in becoming a camp host? For people who say, “Hey, I’d like to do that,” walk them through, give them some suggestions based on your research and the way you guys did it.

Erik Anderson:

Okay, sure. Well, in terms of starting to do the research, most state websites and state park websites have a volunteer section to it. You can follow a couple links to get into the volunteer opportunities and that’s a great place to start.

Then there’s some other places too, like volunteer.gov has many listings for camp hosting positions around the country. And they’ve got a lot of jobs.

And then we also have a subscription to Workamper News which has paid types of work and camping situations. It also has volunteer camp host opportunities as well. So that’s where we got a lot of our initial information.

Jeanne Anderson:

That’s where you can do it online. Like I said, we were lucky. We got a chance to actually visit the parks. Not everybody can do it. So those places are how you can start online.

The camp host application process was all online

Erik Anderson:

I think most of the application processes these days are online. And in fact, for Delaware State Parks, that’s what we were told to do – go online.

We had to submit a separate application for both Jeanne and myself. And it was fairly comprehensive, asked a lot of questions, had some essay questions in there where we had to actually write about why we wanted to be camp hosts and why we felt that and what qualities we had would make us good camp hosts and why.

But it was a fairly easy online process.

And I think that’s probably the way the majority of folks do get their camp hosting positions because they may be in Florida, but they want to do camp posting in Montana or Colorado or something. And so it’s typically online like that.

We just seized the opportunity because we happened to be there in Delaware visiting the kids and the grandkids, that we went around to the parks.

And that is one of my suggestions to folks,  that if they happen to be in an area where they think they might like to do a camp hosting assignment someday or the next year, to really search out the camp hosts, the rangers, the park manager especially and introduce themselves and try to get to know them, because especially in this digital day and age everything is computerized and you don’t get that face-to-face interaction very often.

Jeanne Anderson:

The human contact. Yeah.

Erik Anderson:

And it helps you stand out, I think, among the competition because the park management can match a name with a faces, and I think that might give you an edge.

When’s the best time to apply to be a camp host?

Mike Wendland:

What month of the year did you apply and ask for this job?

Erik Anderson:

This was back in early October, the first week of October.

Mike Wendland:

So when ideally, when would you urge people to apply for one of these jobs? Because there is competition.

Jeanne Anderson:

September, October.

Erik Anderson:

Yep. October.

Jeanne Anderson:

September, October. Yeah.

Mike Wendland:

Early fall.

Erik Anderson:

September and into October. Yeah. In fact, the state manager’s volunteer manager said that that was the ideal time as well, because that’s when they really start looking to try to fill the next year. But they said they always have needs typically. And some people back out, they have cancellations, so it never hurts to try.

Mike Wendland:

And how long are you guys going to be camp hosts in Delaware? Six months did you say?

Jeanne Anderson:

Yeah, that’s a long time.

Erik Anderson:

Yeah.

Jeanne Anderson:

That’s the one thing we’re like … Three months would’ve been a little better and then we could have maybe said, “We’ll stay another three months.” But for some reason we-

Erik Anderson:

We made that commitment.

The best and worst parts they anticipate in being a camp host

How to Be a Camp Host: Super Helpful Advice 4

Mike Wendland:

I would be curious to hear from both of you what you anticipate you will like the most about this job and the least about this job. You want to start off, Jeanne?

Jeanne Anderson:

The least, cleaning toilets, which I didn’t realize we were going to do, but that’s what we’re going to do.

The most, is just interacting with the campers. And so that’s the most I’m looking forward to because everybody here is on the same page with us. Life is good. We’re out camping and so that’s the best thing I’m looking forward to, greeting and meeting the campers.

And of course I don’t want to clean a bathroom. There you go.

Mike Wendland:

So I wonder who’s going to get that job. Erik, best and worst?

Jeanne Anderson:

We’ve already said it.

Erik Anderson:

I volunteered to get her out of that.

Jeanne Anderson:

But we have to clean up a lot of the campsites, the cabins. We have to do a lot of that. So that’ll be okay.

Mike Wendland:

And what about you, Erik? What do you think is the best and worst?

Erik Anderson:

Pretty much the same. The best part, certainly I’m looking forward to interacting with all the campers and the guests. That’s one thing that struck us on our travels around is that far too many times we never even saw a camp host, which I thought was interesting.

We could be staying in the state park or something for a week or so, and we may never even seen a camp post. Or if we did see them there were just … And I know they’re working, but they’re just tooling along in the golf cart. And we hardly ever were greeted or the camp host hardly ever checked in with us to say hello.

Jeanne Anderson:

No interaction.

Their goals as camp hosts

Erik Anderson:

There was very much no interaction. So we thought that was kind of odd.

And we want to be the kind of camp hosts who really greet people. And I find with Delaware State Parks and materials they gave us, they’re really big on that. They’re big on hospitality and customer service, being an ambassador. And so we’re looking forward to doing that.

Jeanne Anderson:

It’s not a very big camp. It only has one bathhouse, so it’s not really going to be overwhelmed.  I don’t think it’ll be overwhelming.

Erik Anderson:

Right. It’s 73 sites and 11 rental cabins. It’s not that big.

How many hours do camp hosts work

Mike Wendland:

How many hours a day do you think that you’ll be actually working as a volunteer?

Jeanne Anderson:

Possibly five.

Erik Anderson:

Well yeah, about that. I mean, they require 24 hours per person of a couple per week. And then an individual, they require a minimum of 30 hours per week. And then we’ll get the same days off.

Mike Wendland:

And in exchange for that, what exactly do you get? You mentioned real briefly, some of them, but talk about what.

Jeanne Anderson:

Free camping, full hookup,

Erik Anderson:

Full hookup site. Yeah.

Jeanne Anderson:

They do have a water park. They have a water park there for kids. So we get four free tickets each time. So that was a biggie. That was real big, so my grandkids could see it. We can all go to the waterpark every time.

So That’s really exciting. I don’t know. Anything else? The full hookup, the free park. But we can go to other campgrounds.

Erik Anderson:

Free admission to any Delaware State Park during the time we’re there as well, discounts for purchases. Well, they list uniforms as a benefit.

Jeanne Anderson:

Yeah.

Erik Anderson:

That’ll be fun.

Mike Wendland:

I don’t know how to picture you guys in a uniform. Now, we should mention you guys travel with Hershey, the pup. Hershey pup.

Their travels with Hershey Pup

Hershey the camp host dog
Hershey Pup in his spiffy new Camp Host uniform

Erik Anderson:

Hershey pup.

Mike Wendland:

Where is Hershey? We should look at him.

Jeanne Anderson:

Here he is.

Erik Anderson:

Here he comes.

Jeanne Anderson:

He already has his uniform.

Mike Wendland:

Hershey is more famous than you. There he is.

Erik Anderson:

He is.

Jeanne Anderson:

He has his uniform.

Erik Anderson:

Way more famous than us.

Mike Wendland:

Hey, Hershey. What’s up, bud? Oh my gosh he is so cute. What’s he wearing?

Erik Anderson:

He’s actually already got his uniform.

Mike Wendland:

Oh, look at that.

Jeanne Anderson:

He’s a good boy.

Erik Anderson:

So he’s ready to go. Yeah.

Mike Wendland:

He is ready to go. Hershey’s kind of … I’ve always said our Bo is well-traveled, but Hershey is really well traveled. And if people read you guys regularly on our RV Lifestyle Facebook Group when you post, they’ve seen how Hershey’s hiked and  been everywhere.

Jeanne Anderson:

He really is such a good boy. He’s such a good boy.

Erik Anderson:

He does way more than a Cavalier King Charles spaniel was ever bred to do.

Jeanne Anderson:

They were supposed to just sit on someone’s lap.

Erik Anderson:

Yeah, they were bred to just be pampered on the laps of kings and queens. So we don’t want him to hear that.

Mike Wendland:

Yeah. Well, I think he knows. He’s kind of a famous pup as it is.

Jeanne Anderson:

Yeah, he is.

Travel and decision fatigue and the need for rest

Mike Wendland:

Now, I have one question for both of you, because you have traveled so much and clearly enjoyed it. You’re going to be in one place for six months?

Erik Anderson:

Yeah.

Mike Wendland:

In a way, that’s kind of nice I suppose. But on the other hand, you’ve been both bitten by the travel bug.

Erik Anderson:

I’m nervous about it.

Mike Wendland:

Have you had serious discussions about that?

Erik Anderson:

Probably not as serious as we should have had.

Jeanne Anderson:

We’re a little nervous. We’re a little nervous. The only thing that would keep me is that I’ll see my grandkids and my son and my daughter-in-law. That’ll keep me happy. But like I said, I think when we said six months, we’re like, “Why’d we do that?” Just in case. So we’re really just … It all depends on how things go. We can’t really foresee if we’re going to be-

Erik Anderson:

We’re hoping we really like and that it goes well.

Mike Wendland:

On the reverse side of that, and I don’t think a lot of people who are full-timers, we don’t hear this part of the conversation a lot. But after you’ve traveled as much as you guys have, it becomes wearisome in a sense, doesn’t it? I call it the decision fatigue because every place is a new place.

You have to make a decision, “Where are we going to get our supplies and the drug store?” And I know Erik is the researcher in the group. But still, all that becomes a bit tedious, doesn’t it?

Jeanne Anderson:

Yeah.

Erik Anderson:

It does. Yeah. Along with the excitement and wonder of travel, there is that aspect of it and it wears on you a little bit. And I think it has a little.

It just feels strange not to be making my usual reservations for next summer.

Jeanne Anderson:

But then we’re going to Arizona after that for the winter. So that’s another three six-month stay.

Erik Anderson:

One of the things I think will help and that’ll be good about staying in one place for a while is we have a couple projects that we’re going to start working on, that’s been difficult to do when we’ve been constantly moving, moving, moving. Actually, we’re starting to write a little children’s book on Hershey’s grand RV adventures and that’s going to be kind of like a series.

Jeanne Anderson:

Yeah, yeah.

Erik Anderson:

So we’re going to use our downtime to really focus on some of those kind of things. Hopefully that’ll help us get through the period.

Mike Wendland:

We can’t wait to go with you virtually here as you enter this different phase of the RV lifestyle and we’ll urge people … They can follow you on … You post regularly on our RV Lifestyle Facebook group so we can sit … Tell everybody what you’re in. You’re in a motor home, a small Class A motor home.

Erik Anderson:

Yeah, we have a Thor Windsport 29M and it’s 2017. We’re just about 31 feet and that’s been a perfect size for us. Not too big, not too small. And it’s worked out well and we tow our Honda CRV with us.

Mike Wendland:

And right now you’re in Florida, you’ve been down there. How long are you staying in the panhandle? In Miramar Beach?

Erik Anderson:

Right. Well, we’re three months here in the panhandle and-

Mike Wendland:

And when do you start this new position as camp host?

Erik Anderson:

1st of May.

Jeanne Anderson:

May 1st. Yeah.

Mike Wendland:

Yeah. Well, I think there’s been a lot of folks who would have seriously considered doing this and you’ve helped them with some of the process questions and I think you’re going to have a great time Thanks. Erik and Jeanne Anderson, our guests, thank you guys so much.

Jeanne Anderson:

Thank you.

Bonus: For more info on this topic, read:

How to Find Campground Jobs for Couples (5 Resources)

Bottom Line Summary: How to Be a Campground Host

Getting a campground host job can be a great way to spend time outdoors and help others enjoy the beauty of nature. Here are the steps you can follow to get a campground host job:

  1. Research potential locations. Start by looking for campgrounds in the area where you would like to work. Consider factors like location, amenities, and type of campground (e.g. public, private, RV park) when making your decision.
  2. Contact the campground. Once you have identified a few potential employers, reach out to them to inquire about campground host positions. You can usually find contact information on the campground’s website or by calling the campground directly.
  3. Submit an application. Most campgrounds will require you to submit an application, either online or in person. Make sure to include any relevant experience or skills that make you a good candidate for the job.
  4. Prepare for an interview. If your application is accepted, the campground will likely schedule an interview with you to discuss the job in more detail. Prepare by researching the campground and its policies, and practicing common interview questions.
  5. Accept the job offer. If you are offered the job, carefully review the terms and conditions of your employment. Make sure you understand your responsibilities and the expectations of the campground. If you are satisfied with the offer, accept the job and start preparing for your new role as a campground host!

RV News of the Week

Visitors to hot spring on federal land in Utah report painful rash likely tied to parasites

Several people who soaked in the hot springs at Utah’s Fifth Water Hot Springs in Spanish Fork Canyon are reporting a bad rash several days afterward, causing pain, sleepless nights, and scarring.

The hot springs are in the Uinta-Wasatch-Cache National Forest, not far from Salt Lake City. One man, who suffered from a painful rash all over his body for three weeks, was later told it was a type of hot tub or swimmers itch.

Apparently, this type of swimmers itch is often caused by parasites in the water dying in the human’s skin. To learn more, click here.

National Parks Service releases its 2023 free days

The National Parks Service has announced its five free entrance days for 2023 and they are (drumroll please)…

Jan. 16 – Martin Luther King, Jr. day

April 22 – First day of National Park Week

Aug. 4 – Anniversary of the Great American Outdoors Act

Sept. 23- National Public Lands Day

Nov. 11 – Veterans Day

Not all of the more than 400 national parks charge an entrance fee, but many of the most popular ones do. On the free days, that charge is waived to encourage more people to come and visit.

Harvest Hosts stops in California’s San Luis Obispo County questioned by county for permitting people to “camp” 

Several businesses that are part of Harvest Hosts in California’s San Luis Obispo County found themselves in trouble with their planning department recently for allegedly advertising their properties as a campground without proper permits.

The county said it was concerned about things tied to unregulated camping like vegetation catching on fire or pollution. The businesses, including some wineries, tried to explain to the county that people who stay on their property are not camping in a traditional way.

Instead, the guests pay nothing to stay there but typically buy wine or other products from them. They do not have water or sewer hookups, they do not have campfires, and do not do other typical camping activities. Instead, they just sleep in their parked vehicle.

The county government ended up admitting they don’t really have a category for such activity. It will be interesting to see how this resolves and we hope the wineries and other Harvest Hosts businesses will be allowed to continue operating there.

To see the story click here. We love Harvest Hosts and recommend them frequently. To join with our discount code, click here.

An image of rime ice on trees near Canary Spring - Mammoth Hot Springs
Rime ice on trees near Canary Spring – Mammoth Hot Springs. Photo by Jim Peaco

Yellowstone National Park closes most roads to cars, officially begins winter hours this Thursday

If you ever needed more proof that winter is here… 

Yellowstone National Park switches to its winter hours this Thursday, Dec. 15. That means most park roads will be closed to automobile travel but snowmobile travel is generally permitted with an approved guide.

Weather permitting, the only roads open to vehicles during the winter season are the North and Northwest entrances. All campgrounds are closed in the winter season, which usually lasts until mid-March. 

Arkansas man creates RV, and Cousin Eddie look, to collect toys for needy families this Christmas

Many RVers know of the movie National Lampoon’s Christmas Vacation with Cousin Eddie and that distinctive RV.

One movie fan in Arkansas is dressing up like cousin Eddie – complete with robe and cigar- and has an RV that looks just like the one in the movie. He is using the “look” to collect toys for needy children this Christmas for the Loaves N’ Fishes Food Pantry in his community.

The approach is so unique, the local television station came by to do an interview. (See story here).

RV Questions of the Week

QUESTION: from Laura

I am thoroughly confused… The spec sheet for the RV I want to buy has both an inverter and a converter. Do I need both or are they different names for the same device? The salesman at the dealership told me not to worry about them, as they do the same thing. If so then why are they both listed?

ANSWER:

Good catch, Laura. The salesman was blowing smoke. You need both.

The terms inverter and converter sound the same, and they both do the same thing – transform power from one type to another, but in exactly opposite ways.

Both are essential components in a modern RV. 

An inverter converts direct current (DC) electricity from your RV’s batteries into the alternating current (AC) electricity that runs your lights, appliances, and motors.

A power converter does the opposite. It converts or transforms the AC electricity that you get when plugged into a pedestal or so-called shore power at a campground into DC Voltage that in turn charges your RV’s house batteries.

Again, you need both.

QUESTION – From Geoffrey

My question concerns an unpleasant subject. I own a 2021 Leisure Wonder Rear Lounge and I LOVE her. So the issue is what product do you use to clean and scrub the toilet.

I last used Clorox Clinging Bleach Gel however I was told it is too strong.

ANSWER:

Chemical-based products like Chlorox and bleach may be fine for your home cleaning but RV toilet bowls are very different than home toilets. 

Besides the obvious differences in plumbing and water use, RV toilets are often made from different materials. The RV toilet does not flush into a septic system or city sewage system like your home toilet does, so what you use to clean your toilet bowl will also affect your RV’s holding (black) tank.

RV toilet bowls are made very differently from home toilet bowls.

RV manufacturers are always trying to reduce weight when it comes to building materials, and most home toilets are entirely made of thick porcelain – which is way too heavy to put in most RVs. So most often these days you will see newer RVs containing porcelain bowls, but plastic toilets.

The best type of toilet bowl cleaning product for an RV is one that is chemical-free, won’t damage the toilet bowl, and will boost the bacteria colonies in your black tank, like Unique RV Toilet Cleaner + Holding Tank Enhancer.

The best thing about Unique’s RV toilet cleaner is that it actually adds a boost of breakdown energy to the bacteria in your black tank. Basically, every time you clean your toilet bowl, you will also be strengthening the breakdown process inside your RV black water holding tank. It’s not a substitute for the treatment you flush down the tank but it adds to the effectiveness.

Instead of a stiff, bristled toilet brush, we recommend using a silicone toilet brush. These brushes do a wonderful job of cleaning the surface of the toilet bowl but are still soft enough to not cause damage. Specifically, avoid using scouring pads of any kind because they can cause a lot of damage to the plastic or porcelain of the toilet bowl.

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Looking for exciting RV trip ideas and travel suggestions?

all ebook travel guides from RV Lifestyle

We’ve written a library of RV Travel books that lay out guided RV explorations of scenic areas of the US that we’’ve explored and think would make an excellent RV trip for you.

In each location, we provide a suggested route and itinerary (7 stops in each guide, one for each day of a week trip!) as well as links to multiple campgrounds and boondocking spots, local tips, and interesting things to do at each location.

You can hit everything in seven days, do a whirlwind weekend tour, or you can take your time and explore the area over a 2+ week period.

Planning an RV trip can be very time-consuming so that’s why we’ve done the research for you! Just take our guides and use them. We’re sure you’ll have an RV trip for the ages! Instant download. CLICK HERE for information on our RV Travel Guides


How to Be a Camp Host: Super Helpful Advice 5

Get the Home Study Course today and worry about the road, not the repairs!
Every time you move your RV it’s like driving through a hurricane during an earthquake. Parts break and many items need to be maintained, this program will show you how you can save time and money by gaining the confidence to take on the majority of the issues you’ll come across. Don’t get caught with your RV in the shop! Learn how you can maintain and repair your RV at your own pace and at the most convenient time for you! This course is produced by the National RV Training Academy.



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These pre-owned products have been professionally inspected, tested and cleaned by Amazon-qualified suppliers. - There will be no visible cosmetic imperfections when held at an arm’s length. - Products with batteries will exceed 80% capacity relative to new. - Accessories may not be original, but will be compatible and fully functional. Product may come in generic box. CHECK THIS PAGE OUT BY PRESSING HERE


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